Yungang Grottoes

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Yungang Grottoes, one of the top ten Grottoes in China, is located at the southern foot of Wuzhou Mountain, 17 kilometers west of Datong City, Shanxi Province, northern China, and the Northern Bank of Wuzhou Sichuan. Its geographic location is 113º20', and 40º04'.

The Yungang Grottoes are excavated in accordance with the mountain, with a vast scale and vigorous momentum. They stretch about 1 kilometer from east to west. The grottoes are divided into three areas: east, middle and West according to the natural mountain situation from east to west. There are 45 main caves and 209 subsidiary caves, with an area of more than 18,000 square meters. The highest statue is 17 meters and the smallest is 2 centimeters. There are more than 1,100 Buddhist niches and more than 59,000 statues in size. According to the excavation time, it can be divided into three periods: early, middle and late. The grotto statue styles in different periods also have their own characteristics. In the early period, the "Five Grottoes" were magnificent, with a strong and simple western atmosphere; in the middle period, the grottoes were well known for their exquisite carving and ornate decoration, showing a complex, varied and magnificent artistic style of the Northern Wei Dynasty; in the late period, although the grottoes were small in size, the figures were thin, handsome and moderately proportioned, and they were the stones of northern China. An example of grotto art.

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Yungang Grottoes was founded from 460 to 524. It has a history of 1500 years. It is the first time that Buddhist art has been introduced into China. It is a treasure house of Buddhist art that a nation carved in a dynasty and became a royal style. It is also a historical monument of the integration of Chinese and Western cultures in the 5th century A.D. Yungang Grottoes are the beginning of the "sinicization" of grotto art. The Chinese palace sculpture in the middle period of Yungang Grottoes and the Chinese Buddhist statue niches developed on this basis have been widely used in the later construction of grotto temples. The layout and decoration of the caves in the late Yungang Grottoes highlight the strong Chinese style of architecture and decoration, reflecting the deepening of the "Sinicization" of Buddhist art.

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