Chinese calligraphy

Chinese calligraphy

Chinese calligraphy has undergone a long process. Calligraphy is a unique art in China. Although the standardization of the art of calligraphy did not take place until the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty, the art of calligraphy should be at the same time as the birth of Chinese characters. The formation of Chinese characters has gone through a long historical period.

The earliest ancient Chinese character materials recognized by academia are oracle bone inscriptions and gold inscriptions in the middle and late Shang Dynasty (about 14 to 11 centuries ago). From the late Shang Dynasty to the unification of China by Qin Dynasty (221 years ago), the general trend of the evolution of Chinese characters was from complex to simple. Evolution is reflected in the evolution of fonts and fonts. In the late Western Zhou Dynasty, the linearization of bronze inscriptions and the development of folk seals in the Warring States Period to ancient Li Dynasty greatly weakened the Hieroglyphic Character of the characters. However, the artistry of calligraphy has become more and more rich with the evolution of calligraphy.
Chinese calligraphy

Chinese calligraphy is an ancient writing art of Chinese characters. In the embryonic period of Chinese calligraphy (from Yin Shang to the late Han Dynasty and the three kingdoms), the writing experience was divided into oracle bone inscriptions (Shang Dynasty), bronze inscriptions (Zhou Dynasty), big seal inscriptions, small seal inscriptions (Qin Dynasty), official script, cursive scripts, running scripts (Han Dynasty), regular scripts (Wei and Jin Dynasty).

Chinese calligraphy

Famous Calligraphers in Chinese History

In the Eastern Jin Dynasty (Wang Xizhi), in the early Tang Dynasty (Ouyang Xun), in the flourishing Tang Dynasty (Yan Zhenqing), in the late Tang Dynasty (Liu Gongquan), and in the Yuan Dynasty (Zhao Mengfu).